Lista de tribos celtas

Na Galipedia, a Wikipedia en galego.
Mapa da expansión dos celtas
Fogares:
H: Cultura de Hallstatt;
L: Cultura de La Tène;
Rexións:
B: Illas Británicas ;
I: Iberia;
G: Galatie;
Zonas de expansión:
1: berce alpino;
2: expansión máxima (fins do século III)

Esta é unha lista de tribos celtas, celtizadas ou celtas en orixe, coa súa localización xeográfica.

Lista de pobos da Galia (coas súas capitais):

Galia[editar | editar a fonte]

Mapa da Galia no século I a.C.
Tribos galas en Galia, aproximadamente as actuais Bélxica, Francia e Suíza. En determinados momentos tamén cubriron parte de Italia do Norte e o Centro Norte da Península Ibérica.

Galia Cisalpina[editar | editar a fonte]

Galia Transalpina[editar | editar a fonte]

Península Ibérica[editar | editar a fonte]

Cartaginensis[editar | editar a fonte]

Gallaecia (século III d.C)[editar | editar a fonte]

Lusitania (Século III d.C)[editar | editar a fonte]

Tarraconensis[editar | editar a fonte]

Illas Británicas[editar | editar a fonte]

Britania[editar | editar a fonte]

Hibernia[editar | editar a fonte]

    • Autini (Irlanda)
    • Vennicnii (Irlanda)
    • Vodie (Irlanda)
    • Velabri (Irlanda)
    • Robogdii (Irlanda)
    • Eblani (Irlanda)
    • Magnate (Irlanda)
    • Manapii (Irlanda)
    • Iberni (Irlanda)
    • Herpeditani (Irlanda)
    • Coriondi (Irlanda)
    • Darini (Irlanda)
    • Cauci (Irlanda)
    • Brigantes (Irlanda)
    • Gangani (Irlanda)

Europa central[editar | editar a fonte]

Dacia e Tracia[editar | editar a fonte]

Tribos celtas de Tracia previamente á chegada de Roma.


Iliria[editar | editar a fonte]

Anatolia[editar | editar a fonte]

Notas[editar | editar a fonte]

  1. John Boardman, I. E. S. Edwards, E. Sollberger, and N. G. L. Hammond, The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. 3, Part 2: The Assyrian and Babylonian Empires and Other States of the Near East, from the Eighth to the Sixth Centuries BC, ISBN 0521227178, 1992, p. 600: "In the place of the vanished Treres and Tilataei we find the Serdi for whom there is no evidence before the first century BC. It has for long been supposed on convincing linguistic and archeological grounds that this tribe was of Celtic origin"
  2. Dio Cassius, Earnest Cary, and Herbert B. Foster, Dio Cassius: Roman History, Vol. IX, Books 71-80 (Loeb Classical Library, No. 177), 1927, Index: "... 9, 337, 353 Seras, philosopher, condemned to death, 8. 361 Serdi, Thracian tribe defeated by M. Crassus, 6. 73 Seretium,""
  3. J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0631198075, p. 140: "... Autariatae at the expense of the Triballi until, as Strabo remarks, they in their turn were overcome by the Celtic Scordisci in the early third century BC ..."
  4. Frank W. Walbank, Polybius, Rome and the Hellenistic World: Essays and Reflections, ISBN 0521812089, 2002, p. 116: "... in A7P 60 (1939) 452 8, is not Antigonus Doson but barbarians from the mainland (either Thracians or Gauls from Tylis) (cf. Rostovizef and Welles (1940) 207-8, Rostovizef (1941) 111, 1645), nor has that inscription anything to do with the Cavan expedition. On ..."
  5. Adrian Goldsworthy, How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower, ISBN 0300137192, 2009, p. 105: "... who had moved to the Hungarian Plain. Another tribe, the Bastarnae, may or may not have been Germanic. ..."
  6. Christopher Webber and Angus McBride, The Thracians 700 BC-AD 46 (Men-at-Arms), ISBN 1841763292, 2001, p. 12: "... never got near the main body of Roman infantry. The Bastarnae (either Celts or Germans, and `the bravest nation on earth' - Livy ..."
  7. 7,0 7,1 Ioana A. Oltean, Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization, ISBN 0415412528, 2007, p. 47.
  8. 8,0 8,1 Ion Grumeza, Dacia: Land of Transylvania, Cornerstone of Ancient Eastern Europe, ISBN 0761844651, 2009, p. 51: "In a short time the Dacians imposed their conditions on the Anerati, Boii, Eravisci, Pannoni, Scordisci,"
  9. A. Mocsy and S. Frere, Pannonia and Upper Moesia. A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire. p. 14.
  10. Andrea Faber, Körpergräber des 1.-3. Jahrhunderts in der römischen Welt: internationales Kolloquium, Frankfurt am Main, 19.-20. November 2004, ISBN 3882705019, p. 144.
  11. Velika Dautova-Ruševljan and Miroslav Vujović, Rimska vojska u Sremu, 2006, p. 131: "extended as far as Ruma whence continued the territory of another community named after the Celtic tribe of Cornacates"
  12. Géza Alföldy, Noricum, Tome 3 of History of the Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1974, p. 69.
  13. Alan Bowman, Edward Champlin, and Andrew Lintott, The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol. 10: The Augustan Empire, 43 BC-AD 69, 1996, p. 580: "... 580 I3h. DANUBIAN AND BALKAN PROVINCES Tricornenses of Tricornium (Ritopek) replaced the Celegeri, the Picensii of Pincum ..."
  14. Dubravka Balen-Letunič, 40 godina arheoloških istraživanja u sjeverozapadnoj Hrvatskoj, 1986, p. 52: "and the Celtic Serretes"
  15. John T. Koch, Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia, ISBN 1851094407, 2006, p. 907.
  16. 16,0 16,1 J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0631198075, p. 81: "In Roman Pannonia the Latobici and Varciani who dwelt east of the Venetic Catari in the upper Sava valley were Celtic but the Colapiani of ..."
  17. J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0631198075, p. 140: "... Autariatae at the expense of the Triballi until, as Strabo remarks, they in their turn were overcome by the Celtic Scordisci in the early third century"
  18. J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0631198075, p. 217.
  19. J. J. Wilkes, Dalmatia, Tome 2 of History of the Provinces of the Roman Empire, 1969, pp. 154 and 482.
  20. Charles Anthon, A Classical Dictionary: Containing The Principal Proper Names Mentioned In Ancient Authors, Part One, 2005, p. 539: "... Tor, " elevated," " a mountain. (Strabo, 293)"; "the Iapodes (Strabo, 313), a Gallo-Illyrian race occupying the valleys of ..."
  21. J. J. Wilkes, The Illyrians, 1992, ISBN 0631198075, p. 79: "along with the evidence of name formulae, a Venetic element among the Japodes. A group of names identified by Alföldy as of Celtic origin: Ammida, Andes, Iaritus, Matera, Maxa,"
  22. 22,0 22,1 22,2 22,3 22,4 22,5 22,6 22,7 22,8 22,9 Prifysgol Cymru, University of Wales, A Detailed Map of Celtic Settlements in Galatia, Celtic Names and La Tène Material in Anatolia, the Eastern Balkans, and the Pontic Steppes.